Tag Archives: Digital Cinema

Ongoing Sec – More Exploited Vulnerabilities Patched

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12 November – Every freakin’ month (2nd Tuesday) there is a new set of Microsoft vulnerabilities, so much so that we have ignored reporting them.

But this month there is yet another set of Critical vulnerabilities that is being exploited in the field – read about it here at Krebs:

Zero-Days Rule November’s Patch Tuesday — Krebs on Security. This explains new Flash updates. [Your editor has eliminated Flash from his system…not worth the bother.]

But note: This does not cure the zero-day exploit that is capable of ruining your whole week~!~!~!

11 June – Another round for Adobe and Microsoft, explained by Krebs:

Adobe, Microsoft Patch Flash, Windows

14 May – Microsoft and Adobe today each released updates to fix critical security holes in their software. Microsoft’s patch batch tackles at least 33 vulnerabilities in Windows and other products, including a fix for a zero-day vulnerability in Internet Explorer 8 that attackers have been exploiting. Separately, Adobe pushed security updates for Flash Player, Adobe Reader, Acrobat and Adobe AIR.

So says Krebs On Security today. Get all the info: Microsoft, Adobe Push Critical Security Updates

6 May – Zero Day Exploit is not only in the open for IE8, but it is published for all hackers to study from.


If you must use a Windows computer, please change over to Firefox immediately (if you haven’t already.) Then read this:

Krebs On Security – Zero-Day Exploit Published for IE8

12 Feb – The normal tuesday repairs to the normallly insecure programs –

Fat Patch Tuesday — Krebs on Security

7 February – Critical Flash Player Update Fixes 2 Zero-Days — Krebs on Security |

These stories never end…not even interesting reading anymore. Just do the upgrades.

Updates are available for Windows, Mac, Linux and Android users. The latest Windows and Mac version is v. 11.5.502.149, and is available from this link. Those who prefer a direct link to the OS-specific downloads can grab them here. To find out if you have Flash installed and what version your browser may be running, check out this page.

16 Jan – Days after the critical Java fix, Kreb’s On Security announces that a new exploit not patch in the version 11 release is being sold on the black-hat black market. First, learn how-to and do turn-off Java until this is patch AND even then, only if you need it.
How to Unplug Java from the Browser — Krebs on Security

Second, read more about the sordid details here: New Java Exploit Fetches $5,000 Per Buyer — Krebs on Security

Security experts on Java: Fixing zero-day exploit could take ‘two years’ | ZDNet

Third: Point others to this site to learn “What Is Java” and how to use it if you absolutely must: What You Need to Know About the Java Exploit — Krebs on Security




13 Jan – Now it is Java wih the critical warnings…Read Kreb’s for the data, but one thing I noticed is that his link for the mac update was wrong and the auto-update that the Mac Java program points to gives an error. So here is the correct link for all OSs: Download Free Java Software, which should point to the right place. Here is where I got a successful Java for Mac download:
Oracle Ships Critical Security Update for Java — Krebs on Security Download Java for Mac OS X
Oracle Ships Critical Security Update for Java — Krebs on Security


8 January – Like the Australians needing new colors on their temperature maps as Ultra Hot turns to Double Extra Super Hot, Microsoft and Adobe are going to need new degrees above Critical and above Vulnerable. In this case, Microsoft should say, “Ultra Vulnerable Even After the Update”, As Krebs on Security explains: “… these vulnerabilities could be exploited to fully compromise vulnerable Windows systems without any help from users. …”

Read the entire piece since it has all the links for the Adobe Reader Flash Player plugin…and AIR and Acrobat…for both Windows and Mac OS.

Don’t delay…here is the link again: Adobe, Microsoft Ship Critical Security Updates — Krebs on Security

Australia adds new colour to temperature maps as heat soars | Environment | The Guardian


Continue reading Ongoing Sec – More Exploited Vulnerabilities Patched

Optical Efficiency in Digital Cinema Projectors

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There is a thread in digital cinema marketing that claims it to be a green technology. This concept is largely based on the environmental savings of transporting a digitized movie via hard disk from the distributor to exhibitor, compared to what it takes to move several film reels the same distance. It is an even more striking comparison when one uses satellite and/or a fibre network, which companies like Aquiva and Smartjog can do for their customers.

The transport of the entertainment material is not the only environmental cost of the movie business nor is it the only positive result. Eliminating film, which utilizes many noxious chemicals and elements, is also a considerable benefit.

Continue reading Optical Efficiency in Digital Cinema Projectors

3Questions – Laser Light Engines

3Questions with LLE logoWhen we think of a digital cinema projector’s light path, we non-optical designers consider the lamp and reflector housing, the condenser lenses and prism assemblies, the DLP or LCOS chip themselves and the lens. There are obviously clever bits in between, for example the optics that will strip the UV and IR from the lamp, physical slits for the light to pass through, as well as techniques for balancing the lamp output for the proper levels of R, G and B.

There is a word that gets used by optics people – etendue – which points to certain characteristics of light that requires the balancing of quantity and angles in a manner that matches the most refined part of the system (in this case the DLP/LCOS device.) This etendue inherently restricts the ability to use more brut force on one end to get more quality light at the other end.

Continue reading 3Questions – Laser Light Engines

Report: 2010 Digital Captioning Symposium

keen logoHow I became a Foreign Film Buff – In 1994, my dad ambitiously told me that captioning was coming to our movie theater in Winston-Salem, NC. I don’t know where he heard that, but for two years, I habitually asked theatre managers if captioning was available, only to find out that it was not. When we assumed that it would be a long time coming for captions, we decided to try foreign films because of the English subtitles, and it was a great experience that we continue to enjoy today with my visits back home.

Continue reading Report: 2010 Digital Captioning Symposium


NIST logo, smallCompliance in DCinema means compliance with the details of several standards groups and organizations. Video compression and Decompression will be compliant with JPEG 2000, a set of standards of the Joint Photographic Experts Group, audio formats are specified by AES (Audio Engineering Society) formats and encryption within the Advanced Encryption Standard of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Federal Information Procession Standards (FIPS). Of course, the over-riding standards group who tied all the nuance together is the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE).

Continue reading DCI Talks NIST

Update Everything Month~! Software Vulnerability Records

October 2010 has had record numbers of updates in core programs from Windows to OSX, in Adobe Products and in Java (now owned and managed by Oracle.) Firefox, Opera, RealPlayer, you name it, Security Vulnerabilities is the new black…now white.

Security Vulnerabilities was a code word, of course. It was a nice way of saying, “A bad guy could create an object in the code of a site that would tickle a hole in the software on your computer, and make it – your computer – do one or more things.” Continue reading Update Everything Month~! Software Vulnerability Records

3D Wonders

exhibition logoProfessional critics are still whining about 3D at the movies. Some is valid, but ill-expressed. None creates the desired effect of educating and motivating a grass-roots effort to insist that the cinemas and studios improve the situation.

This month Patrick Goldstein summarized some of the arguments, and while he had the time and space to round up some past negative articles of others, he spared no space for explaining the good parts of 3D, or the fact that there was plenty of bad CGI in its early days of its evolution. Here is a list of those articles in case our professional readers have been too busy to notice that some part of the populace is speaking out against one-size-fits-all-uncomfortably-glasses and poorly illuminated screens:

Continue reading 3D Wonders

Open Source DCP Mastering

DCP Mastering is the technique of making a final product, such as a movie an ad or trailer, into the form that a digital cinema player and projector can handle. There are several products that do this from Dolby, Doremi and Qube, but they are not for the weak of pocketbook. 

Clyde de Souza just posted an article on RealVision.ae that explains the use of some open source software at:
Free Unencrypted 3D movie DCP mastering for Digital Cinema Servers.

There are several people who have tried different variations, and have lived to tell the tale:

Continue reading Open Source DCP Mastering

Laser Light Engines gets IMAX funding– Putting Light on the Subject

Laser Light Engines LogoIMAX to Form Strategic Partnership With Laser Light Engines Through Equity Investment – Subtitle: Develop High Brightness Laser Light Technology Systems Exclusively for IMAX Digital Theatre Systems and Provide Additional Outsourced Research & Development for IMAX

The path to fully compliant digital cinema presentations is littered with ‘almost’ technologies which the studios allowed until looked aside from until the appropriate technology (one that actually met the spec) was commercially available. Examples of this are the transition from MPEG to Motion JPEG, and the transition from how security keys were handled 5 years ago and how they are handled today.

Continue reading Laser Light Engines gets IMAX funding– Putting Light on the Subject

Security: Connect the Dots–Ongoing

The twin stars around which digital cinema revolves are quality and security. The first allows some leniency; for example, 3D cinema movie quality is only close to the specification required of 2D movies. But security is meant to be multi-layered and well beyond ‘good enough’. From lens to lens, the expectation is that each player will do their part to contribute to a secure whole.

Fortunately, such security is part of a general industry effort that constantly looks for and responds to problems. Unfortunately, there is a lot of nuance that require a professional eye to spot trends. In a field full of artists on very tight schedules and increasingly tight budgets, the art of security can take a lower priority if the ramifications are not known. 

Continue reading Security: Connect the Dots–Ongoing